Your Health and Dust Mites

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dustmites

Spring is the time of year we start experiencing the sniffling and sneezing caused by seasonal allergies. While many people suffer from seasonal allergies – some experience these symptoms year-round. Dust mite allergies are a common trigger for asthma, non-seasonal allergies, and atopic dermatitis and can effect those who are allergic year-round. Here are some tips of mite reduction, dust mite facts and  information.

  • 10% of the human population is allergic to the waste of these little creepy crawlies and 80% of allergy suffers are sensitive to them as well.
  • Dust mites thrive in temperatures 68-70℉ and a RH of 70-80%
  • The America College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology estimates that as many as 90% of people with allergic asthma are sensitive to dust mites, and at least 45% of young people with asthma are allergic to dust mites

Dust Mite Control Tips

  • dehumidifier can help bring humidity down below 50% RH where dust mites cannot survive. This is one of the easiest ways to control dust mite populations in your home.
  • Use micro-filtration bags in your vacuum this can help keep mites and mite wast from being recirculated back into the air.
  • Use dust proof zip-able covers on mattresses and pillows.

Facts

  • Dust mites are too small to be seen with the naked eye but when seen on a microscope they are light in color and have eight legs
  • Mites feed on dead skin
  • The average lifespan of a dust mite is 80 days
  • There are 13 different types of dust mites, the most common species in the United States are the Dermatophagoides Farinae and the D. Pteronyssinus.
  • Common dust mite hiding spots include mattresses, bed linen, upholstered furniture, long-fiber carpets, and soft toys