Blog Post 4: Top 10 Signs of High Humidity

For health and comfort reasons, it’s important to maintain a proper humidity level in your home.  While too little humidity can cause discomfort issues, too much moisture can lead to health problems, discomfort issues, and property damage. Dehumidifiers can help remedy these excess moisture problems.  Let’s take a look at some signs that indicate that you may need a dehumidifier.

First, let’s talk about a few signs that you can’t see but can likely feel. These often contribute to health problems and discomfort issues.  Reducing humidity to control these issues will help create a Comfortable Space.

  • High Humidity
  • Poor Air Quality
  • Sticky Feeling
  • Bacteria Growth

Next, is what you can see. These are common visual indicators that you have a humidity problem which is slowing damaging and destroying your Home and Property.

  • Mold/ Mildew Growth
  • Pest infestations
  • Cupping of Wood Floors
  • Stains on Walls and Ceilings
  • Wood Rot
  • Blistering Pain
Signs of Moisture Problems

Some common tell tale signs that you have a moisture problem.

If you’re not doing so already, take a few moments to look around your home for signs of high humidity. You may be surprised at what your house is trying to tell you.

Next week, in our fifth and final post in this series, we will be discussing how a dehumidifier works to control moisture. We’ll see you then.

Blog Post 2: Help! What’s the Difference Between Relative Humidity and Dew Point?

Many people confuse relative humidity with dew point.  They often hear about dew point on the weather channel, but aren’t really sure what it means. Let’s take a closer look at these two concepts.

To put it simply, relative humidity is the amount of moisture in the air compared to what the air can “hold” at that temperature.  So if I was to say that the relative humidity, which is always measured in a percentage, was 100% that means that the air is holding its maximum water vapor capacity at that temperature.

It’s important to understand that relative humidity is relative to the temperature.  In order to understand this concept, let’s take a look at the diagram below.  The glasses represent the temperature, so the smaller the glass the colder the temperature and vice versa.  When looking at the first glass you notice that colder air has a smaller capacity for holding moisture and has a high relative humidity.  As the temperature increases (glass gets bigger), the air is able to hold more moisture and the relative humidity decreases.   In fact, for every degree that the temperature increases, the relative humidity decreases about 2%.

RH Chart

We don’t always use relative humidity to describe the amount of moisture in the air.  Sometimes we refer to dew point.  The dew point is the temperature at which the relative humidity equals 100%.  Unlike RH, the dew point does not change with air temperature.  In that sense it is an “absolute” measurement of the amount of water vapor in the air.

Dew Point is also a great measure for comfort.  If the dew point is below 60 degrees it is comfortable, but if the dew point gets above 70 degrees then it gets very sticky and uncomfortable.  If you know temperature and relative humidity, you can calculate the dew point using a psychometric calculator or an online calculator, like this one www.dpcalc.org

Come back next week for part three in our series discussing the sources of moisture in your home!

Create Comfortable Basement Living Spaces

Finishing the basement is a smart way to add space to your home. And since basements are usually the same size as the entire first floor of a home, remodeling the basement could essentially double the living space in a one-story home.

Basements can be used for:

  • Family room
  • Man cave
  • Exercise room
  • Play room
  • Home office
  • Laundry room

BUT a basement can be a difficult area to use as living space because the environment is typically colder and more humid than above ground space.  For example, moisture coming through concrete basement floors and walls due to moist soil on the outside may result in as much as 100 pints of water per day.  These conditions are not only uncomfortable but also damaging to the building materials, furnishings, electronics, etc., and can lead to the new space not getting used.

According to experts, basement relative humidity (RH) should be kept at or below about 65 percent during the summer.

The Santa Fe line of high-efficiency, energy-efficient dehumidifiers offer time-tested technology to maintain 50% or less relative humidity in your home – ideal conditions for an odor-free, comfortable, healthy living space for you and your family.